“The question isn’t what are we going to do. The question is what aren’t we going to do” Ferris Bueller

Debbie-Haskell-150x150Over recent months it would appear that even celebrities are not immune to taking a leaf out of Ferris Bueller’s book and having a “sickie” from work. Maybe they don’t go to such great lengths to hide their deceit or create such mayhem but none the less they are just like the one-third of British workers who admit to having “pulled a sickie”, according to research by professional services firm PwC. Danny Dyer’s daughter revealed he “lays around on the sofa all day” when he should be working. Zayn Malik left a gig early and was then seen jetting off to LA a couple of hours later and most recently, Nick Grimshaw had a heavy weekend partying and told his bosses he couldn’t make it in (let’s hope he takes his new X Factor role more seriously) .

The cost to UK businesses of these unauthorised days off is around £9 billion per year, a sizeable portion of the £23 billion per year that sickness absence costs as a whole.

The most popular reasons for taking time off, according to the survey of more than 2,000 adults, are hangovers (32%), being bored by their job (26%) and interviews with another employer (26%). One worker in nine (11%) said they had lied to enjoy the good weather, while 8% had done so for a sporting event. Just over one in 10 had phoned in sick because it was Monday.

Some of the imaginative excuses given for missing work were:

“I’ve accidently locked myself in the bathroom and I have to wait until someone with a key to the house can come round to let me out.”

“I’ve accidently sent my uniform to the charity shop so I need to go and buy it back.”

“I thought it was a bank holiday and I’m 500 miles away.”

“I missed the stop on the train this morning and I can’t get off the train now until London.”

For employees who need a helping hand to wax lyrical as to why they have not turned up, a new Android app, Skiver, can help users pull a sickie. The app allows would be skivers to select how many days off they are looking for and provides a selection of plausible illnesses along with a list of the relevant symptoms to dupe their boss. The app even provides an email which can be sent directly to the user’s boss notifying them of the absence. Once their cover story is in place it even provides the user with suggested activities in their area to so they can make the most of their extra time off.
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Zero hour contracts: the situation post-election

Debbie-Haskell-150x150Zero hours have received a lot of bad press in the past few months with the media reporting on the likes of smiley and sad faces being used to communicate whether an individual was required to work. Interestingly, zero hour or casual contracts have been knocking around for a long while; my very first job was on that basis and, as it was before the prevalence of mobile phones, the age old drawing of straws was used instead.

The issue of zero hour contracts features regularly in questions from our business clients; particularly seasonal businesses. When speaking with small business owner Judith* recently, she raised the topic of the feasibility of using a zero hour contract. After chatting with her it became apparent that what she needed was flexibility with her staff’s working availability. Her business was such that she had discernible busy and quiet times of the year, but her trade attracted casual employees – primarily students – who left as the season quietened. Because of this, her staffing levels were just about right and, as it had never been her practice or intention to have her staff work either no hours, or very minimal hours a week, we advised her on a more appropriate approach.

This is not an uncommon query from SME’s, maybe because there was no legal definition of a ‘zero-hour’s contract’ and it has been used interchangeably with ‘casual contracts’. On the 26th May 2015 the Government implemented certain provisions of The Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015, which now defines a zero hours contract as a contract of employment or other workers’ contract where any agreement to perform work or service is conditional upon the employer making it available and where there is no certainty that work will be offered. The government has also banned clauses in these agreements which would prevent an individual from working elsewhere whilst waiting for the offer of work – the much touted ‘exclusivity clause’.

As with all new pieces of legislation, its impact is still to be seen, but it still does not address one of the main causes for concern; that being the uncertainty of any employment and whether the offer will be for sufficient hours to live off and it also holds complications for employers such as the calculation of holiday pay.

Zero-hours contracts clearly have a place in society, but as my colleague has previously blogged they also have their limits.
*name has been changed